Quality in Manufacturing - Making The Case for Quality In a Manufacturing Environment

Quality In Manufacturing

Making the Case for Quality

In a manufacturing environment, quality improves reliability and increases production. Fewer defects translates to fewer warranty claims and increased customer satisfaction. Process improvements also eliminate waste, improve flow and enhance workplace safety, all contributing to the bottom line.

Geometrica Builds ISO 9001 QMS on Wiki (PDF, 441 KB)
Geometrica, a manufacturer of domes and free-style structures, used a wiki to document its ISO 9001:2008 quality management system. The company attributes its fast track to certification to the ease and efficiency of wikis. While the original goal was meeting ISO 9001:2008 requirements, the wiki now functions as documentation of its integrated management system with more than 10,000 pages of documentation servicing 67 internal users.

White Paper: The Economic Case for Quality® (PDF, 102 KB)

American Axle and Manufacturing (PDF, 27 KB)
Reduced labor hours from 10 to 3.8 per $1,000 revenue and increased production from 1,900 to 4,600 vehicle axles per day.

ArvinMeritor
This automotive supplier reduced annual costs by more than $2 million, doubled inventory turns, and cut customer complaints nearly in half.

Medrad, Inc. (PDF, 67 KB)
This leading developer and manufacturer of medical devices increased operating revenue as a percent of revenue from 16% in 1999 to 20% in 2002.

KARLEE (PDF, 35 KB)
This Texas-based manufacturer of precision sheet metal and machined components tripled production values in less than 10 years while improving customer satisfaction scores by 32%.

Clarke American Checks, Inc. (PDF, 49 KB)
Based in San Antonio, Texas, this manufacturer of financial forms and accessories increased its market share by more than 50% in five years and implemented more than 20,000 ideas from associates in one year for $10 million in cost savings.

Additional Resources

What Do CEOs Think About Quality? (PDF, 649 KB)
ASQ surveyed executives to learn what they currently think and to help quality professionals make the economic case for quality.
From Quality Progress Magazine - May 2004
Greg Weiler, ASQ project leader

Six Sigma and the Bottom Line (PDF, 136KB)
by Soren Bisgaard and Johannes Freiesleben
This Quality Progress article explains the economic benefits of Six Sigma, Black Belts (BBs) and Green Belts (GBs) must speak the language of upper management.

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